Current news and events

Pharmacogenomics to improve transplantation oncology of metastatic colorectal cancer

Anita Sveen and Pål-Dag Line
Anita Sveen and Pål-Dag Line

Molecular biologist Anita Sveen and surgeon Pål-Dag Line join forces in a new project to improve the patient benefit from liver transplantation of metastatic colorectal cancer. This is a collaborative effort between Dept Molecular Oncology (KRE) and Dept Transplantation Medicine (KIT)

The project is a translational substudy of ongoing clinical studies and will generate the first large-scale molecular and pharmacological data of transplantable metastatic colorectal cancers. This project was recently supported by a research grant from the Norwegian Cancer Society.

Maja Radulovic first author on EMBO J article:An ER for damaged lysosomes

Maja Radulovic
Maja Radulovic

Maja Radulovic, postdoc in Harald Stenmark's group at Institute for Cancer Research and Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming, has previously shown that a molecular machinery known as ESCRT contributes to repair damaged lysosomes. Now, Maja and her co-workers have revealed an additional mechanism that contributes to lysosome repair, namely lipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The results are published in the prestigious EMBO Journal, in an article entitled "Cholesterol transfer via endoplasmic reticulum contacts mediates lysosome damage repair".

Ceremony November 25thDr Ragnar Mørk´s Prize for excellent cancer research 2022 to Marina Vietri

Marina Vietri
Marina Vietri

Marina Vietri from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology is this year's winner of the prestigious Dr. Ragnar Mørk's Prize for cancer research.

She has won the award of NOK 200.000 for her pioneering studies of nuclear envelope sealing in genome integrity and cancer progression.

The prize ceremony took place on 25th of November in the Auditorium of Institute for Cancer Research.

Earlier this year Marina Vietri was awarded the NFR Young Research Talent grant.

Study led by Aamodt and Atar receive attention:Atrial fibrillation the hidden cause of stroke in many patients

Anne Hege Aamodt, chief investigator
Anne Hege Aamodt, chief investigator

A study led by Anne Hege Aamodt, head of the "Stroke, headache and covid research group" at the Department of Neurology and cardiologist Dan Atar has shown that atrial fibrillation is the hidden cause of stroke in many patients, and that long-term heart rhythm monitoring of patients can prevent recurrent strokes in this group.
The results are presented in the European Stroke Journal. The findings have been summarized in a news article on sciencenorway.no, the English version of the award-winning popular science web site forskning.no, and presented via major Norwegian news outlets.

Eliminating RNA Immunogenicity via Chemical Modifications: Good to Know

Besides being the physical link between DNA and proteins, RNAs play several other key roles, including RNA catalysis and gene regulation. Recent advances in the delivery and chemical modifications of RNAs have enabled the development of RNA-based therapeutics, including antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, small interfering RNAs, and messenger RNAs.
In this essay, group leader Mouldy Sioud goes through recent advances in this field, and how their work is relevant for the development of covid-19 vaccines.

Anita Sveen invited speaker at AACR special conference on colorectal cancer

Anita Sveen
Anita Sveen

Anita Sveen, project group leader and member of the Lothe lab at the Department of Molecular Oncology at the Institute for Cancer research, was invited speaker at the AACR special conference colorectal cancer, held October 1-4th in Portland, Oregon, USA.
In her well received speech Dr. Sveen presented the multidisciplinary work from the TEAM-ACT (Tumor Evolution in Advanced Models to Accelerate precision Cancer Therapy) - a strategic research area of OUS. 

New Center of Excellence:Integreat - The Norwegian centre for knowledge-driven machine learning

Arnoldo FrigessiCenter leader
Arnoldo Frigessi
Center leader

Integreat - The Norwegian centre for knowledge-driven machine learning - has been selected as a new Center of Exellence. Arnoldo Frigessi will head Integreat for the first three years. He is the director of the Oslo Centre for Biostatistics & Epidemiology (OCBE), a joint center integrating the activities of biostatistics departments at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital.

The nine new centers appointed by the Norwegian Research Council will each receive NOK 155 million.

In June last year, 36 applicants were invited to further develop their applications. The funding for the nine centers were granted at a meeting on 22 September.  

 

New Centre of Excellence:The PRecision Immunotherapy Alliance (PRIMA) funded with 155 mNOK

Co-directors Johanne Olweus and Karl Johan Malmberg
Co-directors Johanne Olweus and Karl Johan Malmberg

On September 23rd he Research Council of Norway published the results of the latest Centre of Excellence call.
The PRecision Immunotherapy Alliance (PRIMA) was funded as a CoE with 155 mNOK over 10 years.

The center will have Kalle Malmberg and Johanna Olweus as co-directors and includes their groups and that of June Myklebust (PI) at ICR, and also Ludvig Munthe, Jan Terje Andersen and Fridtjof Lund-Johansen at Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (RH) as well as Emma Haapaniemi (NCMM) as PIs and with UiO as host and OUH as partner.

Horizon Europe 2022 funding to research on personalised treatment with biologic drugs

Nils Bolstad
Nils Bolstad

The Tumour Marker Group at the Department of Medical Biochemistry, OUH-Radiumhospitalet, is part of the European SQUEEZE consortium, which in total receives more than NOK 100 million from the EU through the Horizon Europe 2022 call. 

"We are proud to provide analyses of serum drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations in such a prestigious and ambitious European collaboration", says senior consultant and research group leader Nils Bolstad.


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