Current news and events

NORMENT researchers discover genes that shape human brain surface

First author Dennis van den Meer (left) and senior author Ole Andreassen
First author Dennis van den Meer (left) and senior author Ole Andreassen

The surface of our brain, the cortex, is folded into an intricate pattern of bumps (gyri) and grooves (sulci). While individual differences in this pattern have been linked to brain disorders and cognitive performance, very little has been known about how the ‘bumpiness and grooviness’ of the cortex is determined. In a study recently published in the prestigious Science Advances, an international research team conducted the first major genetic study into cortical folding patterns.
«These findings enable experimental studies to identify the biological pathways involved», says professor Ole A. Andreassen, senior author and director of the NORMENT Centre of Excellence at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital.

Researcher of the year 2021 at the Institute for Cancer Research:Kay Oliver Schink

Kay Schink – project group leader at Institute for Cancer Research - was on December 15th awarded the prize Research of the Year from the leadership at ICR for his groundbreaking scientific contributions.

The award of 100 000 NOK is financed by the Radium Hospital Foundation (Radiumhospitalets legater) and is a personal scholarship for stimulating further excellence in research. 

Employee of the year 2021, the Institute for Cancer Research: Idun Dale Rein

Idun Dale Rein – service leader of the flow cytometry core facility - was on December 15th awarded the prize Employee of the Year 2021 from the leadership at the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR). Rein works in the Department of Core Facilities, Unit for flow cytometry. The committee describes Idun Dale Rein as a very competent and service-minded employee who helps customers with everything from choosing the right probe to experimental set-up and interpretation of data. 

Nature Biotechnology publication:New immunotherapy for cancer based on the mechanism of transplant rejection

From left: Muhammad Ali, Eirini Giannakopoulou (shared first authors) and Johannna Olweus (senior author)
From left: Muhammad Ali, Eirini Giannakopoulou (shared first authors) and Johannna Olweus (senior author)

A team of scientists at the University of Oslo, Oslo University Hospital (OUH) Radiumhospitalet and Karolinska Institutet, led by Professor Johanna Olweus, has developed a new type of immunotherapy for cancer. The new treatment makes the patient’s immune cells “believe” that cancer is a transplanted organ that should be rejected.

The results were published in Nature Biotechnology, one of the most prestigious cross-disciplinary scientific journals, on 6 December 2021.

IMPRESS-Norway and Illumina enter into cooperation

Hege Russnes
Hege Russnes

Illumina, one of the largest international diagnostic companies in sequencing, has recently signed a collaboration contract with the national cancer study IMPRESS-Norway. 

"Securing high-quality tissue biopsies can be both challenging and time-consuming," says Hege Russnes, Senior Consultant in Pathology, OUH and Head of the Infrastructure for Precision Diagnostics for cancer (InPreD). " We are grateful to Illumina's support of this project and excited about the opportunity to investigate the match towards the CGP results from the tissue samples."

Funded by 128 mill NOK:Centre for Clinical Treatment Research - MATRIX

Åslaug Helland, centre leader
Åslaug Helland, centre leader

The Research Council of Norway and the Norwegian Cancer Society have allocated 128 mill. NOK for a Centre for Clincial Treatment Research for treatment of cancer. 

"This funding is an important contribution to Norwegian cancer research and will ensure that more patients will be included into clinical trials. The aim is new and better treatment alternatives for hard-to-treat cancers. We will develop next generation diagnostics and treatment for increased overall survival and quality of life for cancer patients all over Norway" says Åslaug Helland, leader of the centre.

 

New vaccine therapy against multi-resistant tuberculosis bacteria is under development

From left: Synne Jenum, Kristian Tonby (shared first authors) and Anne Ma Dyrhol Riise (senior author)
From left: Synne Jenum, Kristian Tonby (shared first authors) and Anne Ma Dyrhol Riise (senior author)
In response to the serious tuberculosis situation in the world, researchers at Oslo University Hospital have for the first time tested a vaccine developed by Danish researchers at the Center for Vaccine Research at the Statens Serum Institut in patients with tuberculosis. 
"Tuberculosis disease occurs when the immune system is no longer able to control the bacteria in people that may have been infected a long time ago. The idea of therapeutic vaccination is to help the immune system to be able to better fight the infection while receiving antibiotic treatment. " says Anne Ma Dyrhol-Riise, chief physician at the Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital and project manager for the clinical study.

Dutch-Nordic Alliance for Precision Cancer Medicine launched

The Nordic countries (Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland) are together setting up national clinical precision cancer trials modelled on the very successful DRUP trial in the Netherlands.

‘This is "a triple win” - for cancer patients, investigators and industry partners’, says Kjetil Tasken from IMPRESS-Norway, ‘as we will generate and gather evidence more rapidly on very rare combinations of diagnosis, mutation and treatment to allow for early implementation of new cancer medicines.’

Kay Oliver Schink identifies a new regulator of macropinocytosis, an important mechanism for nutrient acquisition by cancer cells

First author Kay Oliver Schink (left) and last author Harald Stenmark
First author Kay Oliver Schink (left) and last author Harald Stenmark

In a recent article in Nature Communications, published online on the 12 of November, 2021, project group leader Kay Oliver Schink and his coworkers in Harald Stenmark’s group at the Institute for Cancer Research and the Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming (CanCell) identify a new mechanism how the protein Phafin2 can regulate a process called “macropinocytosis”.


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