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Article in Science from Kalager and Bretthauer:Improving cancer screening programs

Mette Kalager and Michael Bretthauer
Mette Kalager and Michael Bretthauer

National cancer screening programs are widely implemented to reduce cancer incidence and mortality in high-income countries, but there is insufficient knowledge of the utility and potential for harmful consequences of this practice. Several of the programs are introduced without the necessary testing of the methods in advance.
This is the topic of professor Mette Kalager and professor Michael Bretthauer's recent article in the prestigious journal Science.

Tuula Nyman awarded millions for scientific infrastructure for proteomics research

Tuula Nyman
Tuula Nyman

Tuula Nyman is awarded 57 million kroner for her project “National network for advanced proteomic-infrastructrure”, NAPI in short from the Norwegian Research Council.

Nyman is a researcher at the Department for immunology at the Institute of Clinical Medicine at UiO and Oslo University Hospital, and head of the Proteomics Core Facility.

Theodossiou interviewed for Smithsonian Magazine on how natural light may be used to kill cancer cells

Theodossis Theodossioiu
Theodossis Theodossioiu

Theodossis Theodossiou, senior researcher and leader of the Protonics project group at the Department of Radiation Biology, has recently been interviewed for the Smithsonian - the official journal published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
His views on how natural light may be used in future cancer treatment are presented in a feature article entitled "How Studying Bioluminescent Creatures Is Transforming Medical Science".

Pierre Chymkowitch granted support from the FRIPRIO program

Pierre Chymkowitch
Pierre Chymkowitch

Dr. Pierre Chymkowitch from the Department of Microbiology at Oslo University Hospital has recently been granted 8.531 million NOK through the FRIPRO program from The Norwegian Research Council.

The “Researcher Project” receiving support is entitled “Regulation of mitotic transcription by centromeres”. 

Åslaug Helland principal investigator of large, randomized combination trial in mesothelioma

Åslaug Helland
Åslaug Helland

Ultimovacs ASA , a pharmaceutical company developing novel immunotherapies against cancer, announces that the universal cancer vaccine UV1 will be investigated in a randomized, multi-center phase II trial in mesothelioma.
Dr. Åslaug Helland, head of the Translational studies on solid tumours research group at the Department of Cancer Genetic, is principal investigator of the study.

Theodossis A. Theodossiou researcher of the year at the Institute for Cancer Research

Theodossiou with Institute head Kjetil Taskén during the ceremony
Theodossiou with Institute head Kjetil Taskén during the ceremony

Theodossis A. Theodossiou – senior researcher and project group leader at Institute for Cancer Research - was awarded the prize researcher-of-the-year 2019 from the leadership at ICR for his oustanding scientific contribution in 2019. The award of 100 000 NOK is financed by Radiumhospitalets legater and is a personal scholarship for stimulating further excellence in research. 

ERC Consolidator Grant of 20 million NOK awarded to Johanna Olweus

Johanna Olweus (photo: UiO)
Johanna Olweus (photo: UiO)

Professor Johanna Olweus - head of the Experimental Immunotherapy Group at the Department of Cancer Immunology - was awarded the Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) for her project on immunotherapy “OUTSOURCE: Outsourcing cancer immunity to healthy donors”.

New immune-related breast cancer subtypes described in Nature Communications

First author Xavier Tekpli and senior author Vessela Kristensen
First author Xavier Tekpli and senior author Vessela Kristensen

In a study published December 3rd in Nature Communications, Xavier Tekpli in Vessela Kristensen’s group and their colleagues from the EMIT study report an immune-related breast cancer subtype which identifies patients with poor prognosis and in need of new treatment strategies.

Scientists from the EMIT study, from left to right:
Bjørn Naume, Therese Sørlie, Hege Russnes, Hege
Oma Ohnstad, Elin Borgen and Gry Aarum Geitvik.

 

 


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