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Kjetil Taskén is awarded the UiO innovation prize

This year's five award winners
This year's five award winners

The University Board at the University of Oslo (UiO) annually awards prizes to scientific staff for outstanding efforts and results. Kjetil Taskén receives this year's innovation prize, and he is awarded the prize for his instrumental work in building up precision cancer medicine in Norway.
- We highlight UiO's very best researchers, communicators and teachers through these awards. This year's five award winners show that long-term, purposeful and hard work contributes to increased competence and knowledge which benefits us all, says rector Svein Stølen.

The spin-out company Authera from Andersen's group has entered a collaborative agreement with argenx to gain in-depth biologic insights into the complex biology of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)

Torleif Tollefsrud Gjølberg and Simone Mester
Torleif Tollefsrud Gjølberg and Simone Mester

The Laboratory of Adaptive Immunity and Homeostasis, headed by Professor Jan Terje Andersen, is in the forefront of studies related to the biology of FcRn, which is instrumental in design of antibody and albumin based therapeutic molecules. Last year, the OUH researchers Simone Mester and Torleif Tollefsrud Gjølberg joined Andersen in establishment of Authera AS - a new pre-clinical-stage biotechnology company dedicated to the discovery and development of novel therapeutic biologics. Now the company has revealed that it has entered a collaborative agreement with argenx, which has developed and is commercializing the first-and-only approved FcRn blocker for treatment of IgG-driven autoimmune diseases. 

Findings covered by national television:Effects of Non-Compulsory and Mandatory COVID-19 Interventions on Travel Distance and Time Away from Home

Co-author Arnoldo Frigessi, Director of OCBE
Co-author Arnoldo Frigessi, Director of OCBE

During the COVID-19 pandemic years, many governments in the world, including in Norway, introduced invasive prohibitions of activities and mobility to control the spread of the virus in times of epidemic surge. 
It is essential to know what works best in mitigating the spread to inform authorities on what to do in the future when a new pandemic hits. As alternative to obligatory measures, governments often formulated advices on behaviours.
Researchers at the Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology of the University of Oslo and the Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norwegian Computing Center and Telenor Research have published a scientific article providing insights into the answer, suggesting that advice may be enough in some situations.

Åslaug Helland receives King Olav V's Prize for Cancer Research 2023

Ingrid Stenstadvold Ross and Åslaug Helland. Photo: Jorunn Valle Nilsen
Ingrid Stenstadvold Ross and Åslaug Helland. Photo: Jorunn Valle Nilsen

Åslaug Helland is awarded the prestigious prize for her excellent molecular and clinical research, particularly on lung cancer diagnosis and treatment and for her efforts to introduce precision oncology for all types of cancer in Norway. The prize, one million NOK, will be presented by HM King Harald V in a ceremony in Oslo on 2 May.
Helland has made important contributions in characterising and identifying target populations of patients and in understanding cancer resistance mechanisms across multiple tumour types. 

PRIME-ROSE: EU project receives 6 million EUR from EU Cancer Mission

Kjetil Taskén
Kjetil Taskén

The European Commission approved the project Precision Cancer Medicine Repurposing System Using Pragmatic Clinical Trials, PRIME-ROSE on 24 April 2023. The project will run for five years (2023-2028) and is funded by the European Commission Horizon Europe Mission on Cancer with 6 mill EUR. The consortium consists of altogether 24 partners, including nine beneficiaries and fifteen associated partners.
The pan-European PRIME-ROSE project is led by Professor Kjetil Taskén, Head of Institute for Cancer Research at Oslo University Hospital. OUH will receive about 20 mill NOK.

Andersen's group contributors to Alzheimer's study published in Science

Researcher Stian Foss and PhD student Siri Aastedatter Sakya.
Researcher Stian Foss and PhD student Siri Aastedatter Sakya.

The Laboratory of Adaptive Immunity and Homeostasis, led by Professor Jan Terje Andersen, is involved in a new study that has been published in the prestigious journal Science. The study sheds light on how new biological insights can provide more effective immunotherapy aimed at age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's. 
The work is a collaboration between Andersen's lab and researchers Leo James at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) and William McEwan at University of Cambridge and the UK Dementia Institute.

Annual Report from the Institute for Cancer Research for 2022

The Annual Report from the Institute for Cancer Research for 2022 is now published.

Institute head Kjetil Taskén says:
“Read about the exciting research by 380 people in 25 research groups, more than 30 project groups and 6 core facilities at the ICR! Activities in the CanCell, and PRIMA (to start) CoEs, MATRIX Clinical Cancer Research Centre, the ACT and KG Jebsen Centres and two OUH strategic research areas and other activities in precision medicine and cell therapy where our researchers are involved are also covered.”

Publication in ClinicalMedicine, part of The Lancet Discovery Science:Mev Dominguez-Valentin published about the low colorectal cancer mortality in Lynch syndrome (LS) individuals

Mev Dominguez-Valentin
Mev Dominguez-Valentin

Mev Dominguez-Valentin from The Department of Tumor Biology is the first author of the article “Mortality by age, gene and gender in carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair gene variants receiving surveillance for early cancer diagnosis and treatment: A report from the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database”, recently published in eClinicalMedicine, part of The Lancet Discovery Science. 

Severe COVID-19 alters LDL, potentially increasing the future risk of cardiovascular disease

Bente Halvorsen. senior author
Bente Halvorsen. senior author

Researchers at Oslo University Hospital and at Wihuri Research Institute in Finland have identified persistent changes in LDL three months after hospitalization with severe COVID-19. Both the composition of the particle and inflammatory capacity have been altered and these alterations could contribute to an increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. The results have been published in the prestigious Journal of Infection. 
Senior author is Bente Halvorsen from the Research Institute of Internal Medicine.


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