Current news and events

OUS-CCC seminar 29/10 13-14 Aud AU1 Radiumhospitalet + Zoom:Jack Imbery & Knut Jørgen Labori

Jack Imbery (left) and Knut Jørgen Labori
Jack Imbery (left) and Knut Jørgen Labori

Jack Imbery, K.G. Jebsen Center for B-cell malignancies, Division of Laboratory Medicine (KLM):
CD45 Phosphatase Regulation: A Possible Novel Therapeutic Target in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia”

Knut Jørgen Labori, Department of HBP Surgery, Division of Surgery, Inflammatory Medicine, & Transplantation (KIT):
Clinical trials in pancreatic cancer - from one-size-fits-all to personalized therapy

The seminar will also be available via Zoom.

Apollo article covering Ira Haraldsen's research:Early dementia revealed by artificial intelligence

Ira Haraldsen (photo: Ola Sæther, UiO)
Ira Haraldsen (photo: Ola Sæther, UiO)

Ira Harldsen, head of the Cognitive Health Research group at the Department of Neurology, OUH, is working on a new and groundbreaking European research project worth 150 million NOK, where the research team will combine something as modern as artificial intelligence with something as old-fashioned as EEG (Electroencephalography) to be able to establish, in a few seconds, whether you have early dementia or not.

Haraldsen's research is presented in a feature article in Apollon - the award winning popular science magazine from the University of Oslo.

Science Signalling paper from Taskén group:Systems analysis of prostaglandin E2 signaling networks through four GPCRs on T cells

Anna Mari Lone (1st author) & Kjetil Taskén (senior author), both Dept. of Cancer Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, OUH
Anna Mari Lone (1st author) & Kjetil Taskén (senior author), both Dept. of Cancer Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, OUH

Immune suppressive mechanisms serve several important biological functions in the human body, which includes controlling autoimmunity and minimizing harmful side effects, inflammation and tissue damage in the course of healthy and successful immune responses to pathogens. These mechanisms, which prevent immunological overshoot, can be hijacked by growing tumor cells, resulting in tumor immune escape, which is a crucial process in tumorigenesis. The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 suppresses antitumor immunity by activating its four related GPCRs (EP1 to EP4) on T cells.

 

Nature Genetics publication:New causes for Alzheimer's discovered

Ole Andreassen
Ole Andreassen

An international research team, led by Danielle Posthuma from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Ole Andreassen from from The Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT) at the Division for Mental Health and Addiction Oslo University Hospital and the University of Oslo, has conducted large-scale genetic research into the different backgrounds of the risk of Alzheimer's disease.
The results, which have been published in Nature Genetics, pointed towards the involvement of genes specifically expressed in microglia, indicating that these types of cells, which are known to be involved in immune system, are important in the pathogenesis of AD.

Lasse Pihlstrøm's research on dementia presented in Apollon

Lasse Pihlstrøm (photo Ola Sæther, UiO)
Lasse Pihlstrøm (photo Ola Sæther, UiO)

Lasse Pihlstrøm from the Department of Neurology at OUH reveals new secrets in dementia diseases by studying which genes are turned on and off in the brain tissue of 500 dead Dutch people. Thanks to the brain bank in Amsterdam, which has stored brain samples for a number of dead patients, dementia researcher Lasse Pihlstrøm is in the process of revealing new molecular details of the two diseases Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia.

Pihlstrøm' research is presented in an extensive feature article in Apollon - the award winning popular science magazine from the University of Oslo.

Publication from The Norwegian Cancer Genomics Consortium in Genome Medicine

Anita Sveen and Bjarne Johannessen
Anita Sveen and Bjarne Johannessen

Project group leaders Anita Sveen and Bjarne Johannessen at Department of Molecular Oncology at the Institute for Cancer Research are 1st and 2nd authors of a major work presenting the ”expressed mutation dose” as a determinant of the functional consequences of mutations in colorectal cancer.

The article - entitled "The expressed mutational landscape of microsatellite stable colorectal cancers" is published in the journal Genome Medicine.

Novel gene expression-based classification of metastatic colorectal cancer published in Genome Medicine

S. Hossein Moosavi, 1st author
S. Hossein Moosavi, 1st author

The multidisciplinary team of the K.G.Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre publishes a novel gene expression-based classification of metastatic colorectal cancer.
PhD student S. Hossein Moosavi in Anita Sveen’s project group at the Dept. of Molecular Oncology at the Institute for Cancer Research is 1st author of this paper published in Genome Medicine.
This is the first large study of multi-metastatic gene expression profiling of colorectal cancer liver metastases, and the new metastasis-oriented subtyping framework showed prognostic relevance in the context of tumor heterogeneity. 

Discovered gene patterns can predict prostate cancer treatment response

The Norwegian team. 
From left: Dr. Alfonso Urbanucci and Dr. Nikolai Engedal
The Norwegian team. From left: Dr. Alfonso Urbanucci and Dr. Nikolai Engedal

Approximately 5,000 Norwegian men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. Perhaps the most significant clinical challenge today is deciding which type of treatment will work best for different patient groups. In the study "Single-cell ATAC and RNA sequencing reveal pre-existing and persistent cells associated with prostate cancer relapse" led by Dr Alfonso Urbanucci from Oslo University Hospital and Professor Matti Nykter from Tampere University, and published in Nature Communications, the researchers found that specific patterns in gene expression and DNA organization can predict patient response to treatment.

Ragnhild Lothe awarded the Excellent Researcher Award at the Oslo University Hospital

From the ceremony: Vietri, Lothe and Pihlstrøm.
From the ceremony: Vietri, Lothe and Pihlstrøm.

Three Oslo University Hospital scientists received prestigous awards for their outstanding research on August 27th. The major prize - the "Excellent Researcher Award" - went to Ragnhild A. Lothe. Lasse Pihlstrøm and Marina Vietri both received the "Early Career Award".
The prize money - 300.000 and 150.000 NOK respectively - is earmarked for research activities.

The ceremony was streamed and is available via YouTube.


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