Guest lectures - Metakaryotic biology, a revolution in cancer stem cell research

13 January 2012

Metakaryotic biology, a revolution in
cancer stem cell research

by Professor William G. Thilly
Professor of Genetics, Toxicology and Biological Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Friday January 13 at 11 A.M. The auditorium at the research building, Radium Hospital.

Metakaryotic biology: stem cells of organogenesis and carcinogenesis

The stem cells of human organ development and tumor growth are not eukaryotic cells! They are "metakaryotic"
cells with hollow bell shaped nuclei appended to rather than enclosed in the cytoplasm. They divide by both
symmetric and asymmetric amitoses creating the eukaryotic (mitotic) cells of tissue and tumor parenchyma. Their
"chromosomes" appear to be continuous, joined at telomeres. They create a double stranded RNA/DNA replicative
intermediate prior to and during cytokinesis. They are strongly resistant to x-rays and chemo-"therapeutic" agents.
Multiple agents that kill them in cell culture have been found.

Friday January 13 at 1 P.M. The auditorium at the research building, Radium Hospital.

Metakaryotic biology: stem cell mutation and age-specific cancer mortality rates

Fetal/juvenile organogenic stem cells appear to have very high mutation rates. "Initiation" is presented as blockage
of maturation of organogenic stem cells resulting in a slowly growing mutator/hypermutable preneoplastic stem cell
population. A modified Armitage-Doll two stage cancer model is offered and discussed in terms of colorectal cancer
mortality rates, heritable cancer risk and immigrant cancer pattern shifts.

 
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