Biomedical research at Oslo University Hospital

Oslo University Hospital is a merger of three former university hospitals in Oslo. Biomedical research is one of the hospital's core activities. Research at the hospital is closely interlinked with research undertaken at the University of Oslo. More than 50% of all biomedical research in Norway is published by researchers affiliated with the hospital. Research undertaken cover both basic research, translational research, and clinical research.

Oslo University Hospital has a central role in developing and supporting biomedical research within the South-Eastern Regional Health Authority. The hospital also pursues international research collaborations.

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Summary of publications:

Publications (original articles or review articles) published in 2021 from OUS - Addiction Treatment Research Units

5 publications found

Bækkelund H, Karlsrud I, Hoffart A, Arnevik EA (2021)
Stabilizing group treatment for childhood-abuse related PTSD: a randomized controlled trial
Eur J Psychotraumatol, 12 (1), 1859079
DOI 10.1080/20008198.2020.1859079, PubMed 33537118

Bjørnebekk A, Kaufmann T, Hauger LE, Klonteig S, Hullstein IR, Westlye LT (2021)
Long-term Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Is Associated With Deviant Brain Aging
Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging, 6 (5), 579-589
DOI 10.1016/j.bpsc.2021.01.001, PubMed 33811018

Hauger LE, Havnes IA, Jørstad ML, Bjørnebekk A (2021)
Anabolic androgenic steroids, antisocial personality traits, aggression and violence
Drug Alcohol Depend, 221, 108604
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108604, PubMed 33621808

Midgard H, Ulstein K, Backe Ø, Foshaug T, Sørli H, Vennesland K, Nilssen D, Dahl EH, Finbråten AK, Wüsthoff L, Dalgard O (2021)
Hepatitis C treatment and reinfection surveillance among people who inject drugs in a low-threshold program in Oslo, Norway
Int J Drug Policy, 103165 (in press)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2021.103165, PubMed 33642182

Rognli EB, Bramness JG, von Soest T (2021)
Smoking in early adulthood is prospectively associated with prescriptions of antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants and anxiolytics
Psychol Med, 1-10 (in press)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291720005401, PubMed 33583454

 
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