Baldur Sveinbjørnsson speaks at CCB seminar January 31st at 12:00:

Oncolytic peptide LTX-315; the road from basic science to clinical trials

The CCB seminar Tuesday January 31st will be held by Baldur Sveinbjørnsson from Lytix Biopharma, Oslo Cancer Cluster.
Title of his talk: Oncolytic peptide LTX-315; the road from basic science to clinical trials
Time and place: Tuesday January 31st of at 12:00 hrs in the Auditorium in the Research Building, Institute for Cancer Research, Montebello.
Refreshments are served in the lobby after the seminar

Summary:

Oncolytic peptide LTX-315; the road from basic science to clinical trials

Host defense peptide, also often called Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides (CAPs) are a part of the innate immune system and are present in virtually all species of life, from bacteria, fungi, plants to mammals. Their most studied function is the defense against bacteria, but they also have shown to exert activities against cancer cells. Furthermore, some of the CAPs demonstrate immunomodulatory activities such as chemotaxis and induction of cytokine release. CAPs are able to kill cancer cells at concentration that are harmless to normal cells, due to the typical anionic nature of cancer cell membranes compared to non-malignant cells. Bovine Lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a well-studied 25 amino acid CAP with proven selective antimicrobial and anticancer properties. This peptide is derived from the pepsin hydrolyzation of the iron-binding glycoprotein Lactoferrin, and is present in exocrine secretions such as milk, saliva and in the secretory granules of neutrophils. Through extensive structure activity relation studies (SARs) of shorter peptides modeled after LfcinB, a family of nine amino acid (nonamer) peptides has been developed. The peptides were highly effective against both drug resistant and drug sensitive cancer cells and displayed lower activity towards normal cells. One of the candidates developed, named “LTX-315” is tested in preclinical and clinical studies by Lytix Biopharma.
Preclinical results from animal models, the mechanism of action and potential combination strategies in a clinical setting will be presented.

Link:

Centre for Cancer Biomedicine home page